Australian approved coffee in Amsterdam

As seen originally in the Calgary Herald (February 6 2016):

In four months living in Amsterdam I have learned many things.

I have learned that the Dutch love the word lekker to describe just about anything that they consider enjoyable, from a sandwich to the weather to the cute guy across the street. I have learned to ride a bike into a stream of cars knowing they will yield to me, and I have learned a lot about coffee.

A proper cappuccino is made of one-third espresso, one-third steamed milk, and one-third milk froth. The latte, on the other hand, is generally composed of one shot of espresso, a cup full of steamed milk, and a very small amount of foam on the top. And then we have the flat white, a coffee coined by Aussies, that is apparently more than just a latte in a smaller cup — although I still haven’t quite figured out what else is truly different. I’m used to finding my coffee bliss with a simple large cup of black coffee from Good Earth or Higher Ground back in Calgary, but since arriving in Amsterdam and hanging with a number of Melbourners (who all have some serious coffee standards), I seem to have made the switch to the strong cappuccino.

The Melbourners I know here act as my cafe culture guides, and often times our conversations seem to steer towards comparing the bean and froth quality of different cafes (I tend not to have much to contribute to these conversations).

One late night not too long ago, two of them got into an extensive and enthusiastic talk about their favourite cafes in Amsterdam on the dance floor. A Melbourner named Chaz introduced me to the app “Beanhunter” that helps you locate quality Australian standard cafes wherever you may be. This is every bit as useful as the app Buienradar that Amsterdammers use to predict the rain — to the minute.

Although Amsterdam may be known for its coffee shops that sell joints and hash instead of lattes and carrot cake, it seems to me that coffee is taken pretty seriously over here. And I think Australians have definitely contributed to this (and perhaps they’ve also contributed to the other kind of coffee shop). Almost every time I go into a cafe in Amsterdam, whether they are the owners or the servers or the customers, there are Aussies near.

And while I may not have an Australian fine-tuned cafe standard, I offer a few of my favourite, most lekker coffee spots that I’ve discovered in Amsterdam (so far):

1. Back to Black: Located not too far from Museumplein, Back to Black has become a favourite study spot for me. The pet cat and comfy couches contribute to the living room gezellig* vibes. This is also where I eavesdropped on a 20-minute conversation between two Australians about their favourite cafes in the Netherlands. I suggest the coconut-date power balls and cappuccinos.

1. Coffee and Coconuts: A fellow Calgarian introduced Coffee and Coconuts to me on my first day in Amsterdam. This three-storey space was a cinema back in the day and it’s filled with plants and beanbag chairs. The wooden tables are held up by rope attached to the vaulted ceiling and the art work includes a massive photo of John Lennon that stares at you — peacefully — while you sip your coconut smoothie. The surfer relaxed atmosphere is apparently very Melbourne. If you go, order the scrambled eggs and avocado toast and the orange-ginger tea.

1. Ivy & Bros: Located in the centre of the Red Light District**, Ivy & Bros is a concept store and specialty cafe that wins for the coolest foam art I’ve ever seen. The barista, an Aussie of course, drew a very intricate face in my cappuccino. Major points for this place too because he also served us cold mint water, without even having to ask.

1. cloud art and coffee: Located in the Jordaan, cloud art and coffee is a frequent spot for me. Doubling as an art gallery, the displays on the walls are constantly changing. Right now, they are covered with white mice sculptures. Although my Aussie friend says “the beans aren’t strong enough,” each coffee is served with a mini stroopwaffle (a sweet Dutch delicacy), so I always leave happy. Sit by the window, order some carrot cake to supplement the stroopwaffle and spend your afternoon watching tourists and locals walk by.

*Gezellig (heh-SELL-ick): A word that is literally translated to “cosy” but encompasses much more than just coziness. It means friendly, comfortable, relaxing, and enjoyable. This word encompasses the core of Dutch culture, and people love all things gezellig.

**The Red Light District is a very interesting spot that has been changing within the past few years. The city is trying to push out some of the prostitutes and stoners and attract the specialty flat white drinkers and boutique shoppers. Policies have been put in place to make this happen and entrepreneurs are given subsidies to move into the area. As a result, you can sip on a coffee, listen to Bon Iver and watch British lads marvel at the prostitutes in the adjacent alleyway — all at once!